Thursday, June 8, 2017

Spotlight: Sturgis Brown High School



Auto shop at Sturgis Brown High School





This spring, more than 100 business and postsecondary representatives gathered in the Sturgis Brown High School gym, marking the 10th Annual SBHS Career Fair. Surrounding districts are taking notice, with several busing in students, and teachers visiting to learn how they might do something similar in their own schools.
All Sturgis Brown High School students attend the fair, and teachers help them prepare for the day with tips on dressing professionally and asking good questions.

Coleen Keffeler, the school’s director of career and technical education, leads the effort and has built relationships with many Black Hills area businesses over the years.


“We have a very active advisory board, who helps us plan the fair,” Keffeler says. “The community as a whole is also very supportive of our CTE program. For instance, Pat Kurtenbach with the Sturgis Economic Development Corporation is good about letting me know when a new business comes to town and inviting me to talk to them about our Youth Internship program.”


The career fair is one of many ways SBHS works to help students determine what careers they’re interested in and what they need to do to prepare to go into that field.


A first-year industrial technology student works on a welding project.

With 10 career clusters represented, the school’s CTE program is extensive. It was also the first in the state to offer students Youth Internship, back in the early 1990s.
One benefit of having such a large program, SBHS Principal Pete Wilson explains, is the ability to offer multiple levels of courses, from beginner to advanced. For instance, in the auto shop pictured above, freshmen work on small engines on the tables to the right. If they continue taking the automotive technician sequence of courses, eventually they get to bring in their own cars to practice routine maintenance like oil changes and tire rotations.

Some Sturgis Brown agriculture students raise animals like chicks and pigs.

“We have awesome staff here, both in CTE and non-CTE areas. There are a lot of partnerships and collaboration between CTE and other departments,” Keffeler says. “Probably about half of our seniors use either their Youth Internship, CTE classes or CTSO [career and technical student organization] membership as the basis of their Senior Experience. That’s pretty exciting.”
One example of this collaborative effort, Keffeler says, is fitness/weight lifting teacher Sage Robinson-Miller, who incorporates the Senior Experience into her Level 3 course. In addition to teaching proper lifts and mentoring less experienced lifters, Level 3 students study an area that they can use for their Senior Experience research paper.
Keffeler says a cross-curricular project in previous years involved AP English students teaming up with culinary, journalism, music and photography students to put on a medieval fair.

Geometry in Construction students built this shed.

SBHS students have also had the opportunity to obtain the National Career Readiness Certificate for the past several years. “I have seen more and more students getting their NCRC,” Keffeler says. “I stress to them that it’s something they can put on their resume and scholarship applications. They’ve really been taking it seriously. Those who end up just one or two points away from earning the next certificate level often ask to retake the test.”

Wood shop
So, what happens after Sturgis Brown graduates leave the school? Perhaps one of the greatest testaments to the power of the Sturgis CTE program is when graduates come back and visit with current students.
“A lot of the businesses that we call to come to the career fair know us pretty well, and they’ll bring in one or two former Sturgis students who are now working for them,” Wilson says. “Coleen also organizes a reverse career fair, where students go and tour businesses in the Sturgis industrial park. They get to hear from Sturgis graduates working at a number of those businesses, too.”


Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Celebrating Teacher Appreciation Week in South Dakota

In honor of Teacher Appreciation Week, several teachers across the state have written guest editorials for their local newspapers:

Beth Kaltsulas is the 2017 South Dakota Teacher of the Year and the 2017 South Dakota Education Association Teacher of Excellence. She teaches math at Yankton Middle School. Read her column in the Yankton Daily Press & Dakotan.


Amanda Christensen is South Dakota's 2016-17 Milken Educator Award winner. She teaches fourth grade at Longfellow Elementary in Mitchell. Read her column in the Mitchell Daily Republic.

Sarah Lutz was the 2016 South Dakota Teacher of the Year. She teaches third grade at Stanley County Elementary in Fort Pierre. Read her column in the Capital Journal.

Allen Hogie was the 2015 South Dakota Teacher of the Year. He teaches math at Brandon Valley High School. Read his column in the Argus Leader.


Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Awards given at annual math and science teachers conference

The South Dakota Science Teachers Association and South Dakota Council of Teachers of Mathematics recently held their 25th Annual Joint Professional Development Conference in Huron. Congratulations to the outstanding math and science educators who received special recognitions!
Photo of four teachers holding awards.
State Level Finalists for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (l to r): Lindsey Tellinghuisen, Willow Lake Elementary; Andrea Thedorff, Black Hawk Elementary (Rapid City); Crystall Becker, Canistota Elementary and Middle School; Lisa Kissner, Huron Middle School
Tracy Moody holding award. Julie Olson standing with her.
Tracy Moody, Sanborn Central High School (left), receives the Outstanding Biology Teacher Award from Julie Olson, Second Chance High School (Mitchell), on behalf of Sanford Health.
Charles Standen holding award and book titled Flying Circus of Physics.
Charles Standen, Spearfish High School, receives the Outstanding Physical Science Teacher Award sponsored by 3M.
Lori Wagner holding award. Standing next to Paul Kuhlman.
Lori Wagner, NSU Center for eLearning High School, receives the Outstanding Mathematics Teacher Award from Paul Kuhlman, Avon Junior High and High School; on behalf of Daktronics.
Julie Olson and Patty Martin holding awards. Standing next to Tom Durkin.
SD Space Grant Consortium Kelly Lane Earth & Space Science Grant winners (l to r): Julie Olson, Second Chance High School (Mitchell); Tom Durkin, SD Space Grant Consortium; Patty Martin, Roncalli High School (Aberdeen)
Jackie Knox and Kelly Hinds holding awards, standing with Tom Durkin. Photo of Laurie Elmore.
Daniel Swets Robotics Awards (l to r): Jackie Knox, Highmore-Harrold Junior High and High School; Tom Durkin, SD Space Grant Consortium; Kelly Hinds, Simmons Middle School (Aberdeen); Laurie Elmore, SDSU Extension Harding County 4-H
Steve Caron holding award, standing next to Cindy Kroon
Steve Caron receives the Distinguished Service to Mathematics Award from Cindy Kroon, president of the SD Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
Millie Palmer standing with Cindy Kroon
Millie Palmer (right) receives the Friend of Mathematics Award from Cindy Kroon, president of the SDCTM.
Judy Vondruska holding award, standing next to Liz McMillan
Judy Vondruska (left) receives the Friend of Science Award from Liz McMillan, president of the SD Science Teachers Association.
Lisa Cardillo holding award, standing between Ben Benson and Liz McMillan.
Lisa Cardillo, Harrisburg High School (middle) receives a Sanford PROMISE Ambassador Award from Liz McMillan, SDSTA president and Sanford PROMISE program director; and Ben Benson, Sanford Research Education Specialist.
Lindsay Kortan holding award, standing between Ben Benson and Liz McMillan.
Lindsay Kortan, Bon Homme High School (middle) receives a Sanford PROMISE Ambassador Award from Liz McMillan, SDSTA president and Sanford PROMISE program director; and Ben Benson, Sanford Research Education Specialist.
Jeff Peterson holding award, standing next to Ben Benson and Liz McMillan.
Jeff Peterson, West Central High School (left) receives a Sanford PROMISE Ambassador Award from Liz McMillan, SDSTA president and Sanford PROMISE program director; and Ben Benson, Sanford Research Education Specialist.

Thursday, February 2, 2017

SD Teacher of the Year and Milken Award winner honored by State Legislature

Beth Kaltsulas (left), the 2017 South Dakota Teacher of the Year, and Milken Educator Award winner Amanda Christensen were recently honored by the State Legislature. Hear what they had to say after being recognized by the House and Senate.
Secretary of Education Dr. Melody Schopp gives Amanda Christensen her Milken Educator Award

Amanda Christensen (middle) with state legislators (l to r) Rep. Tona Rozum and Sen. Joshua Klumb

Beth Kaltsulas (middle) with state legislators (l to r) Sen. Jim Bolin, Rep. Mike Stevens, Sen. Craig Kennedy, Rep. Jean Hunhoff

Beth Kaltsulas and Amanda Christensen in the House gallery

Beth Kaltsulas and Amanda Christensen stand to be recognized in the House gallery

Beth Kaltsulas stands to be recognized in the Senate gallery

Amanda Christensen stands to be recognized in the Senate gallery